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Primary Sources, Inventions That Shaped America

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Item # 901-JV66365
  Model # GALPSPINV
Primary Sources, Inventions That Shaped America
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Primary Source Packs include more than 20 historical documents to help students think critically and analytically, interpret events, and question the various perspectives of history. Award: Academics’ Choice Awards for the Smart Book Award US 2015
  • Size: 8.5 x 11"
  • 20 primary source documents in each pack
  • By Carole Marsh
Inventions That Shaped America Primary Sources are just what teachers need to help students learn how to analyze primary sources in order to meet Common Core State Standards! Students participate in active learning by creating their own interpretations of history using historical documents. Students make observations, generate questions, organize information and ideas, think analytically, write persuasively or informatively, and cite evidence to support their opinion, hypotheses, and conclusions. Students learn how to integrate and evaluate information to deepen their understanding of historical events. As a result, students experience a more relevant and meaningful learning experience. The 20 Inventions That Shaped America Primary Sources are: 1. The cotton gin – 17942. Illustration (1869) published in Harper’s Weekly of the “First Cotton Gin” produced around 18003. Illustration of Robert Fulton’s steamboat the Clermont – ca. 18104. The telegraph, pioneered by Samuel Morse in the 1830s and 1840s5. Illustration of Cyrus McCormick’s mechanical reaper in 1884, first patented in 18486. Photograph of the completion of the first transcontinental railroad at Promontory Point, Utah – 18697. Entry in Alexander Graham Bell’s journal, describing an experiment – 18768. Patent drawing for the telephone (1876) and various reactions to the invention9. Advertisement for Joseph Glidden’s Barbed Wire – late 1800s10. Photograph of Thomas Edison with his invention, the phonograph – 187811. Thomas Edison’s incandescent light bulb – 188012. Photograph of the Wright brothers’ first powered, controlled, sustained flight at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina – December 17, 190313. Telegraph message from Orville Wright to his father – 190314. Advertisement for an early version of the refrigerator – 190515. Henry Ford’s assembly line production process, introduced in 191316. Rubber store advertisement – early 1900s17. Advertisement for penicillin production from Life magazine – 194418. Advertisement for an experimental television broadcasting in New York City by RCA in 193919. The World-Wide Web, developed in the 1960s and 1970s20. Microsoft co-founders Paul Allen and Bill Gates pose with personal computers of the day – 1981Your students will: think critically and analytically, interpret events, and question various perspectives of history. participate in active learning by creating their own interpretations instead of memorizing facts and a writer’s interpretations. integrate and evaluate information provided in diverse media formats to deepen their understanding of historical events. experience a more relevant and meaningful learning experience
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